Feeds

Directgov publishes online wish list

Child truancy alerts and virtual uni tours demanded

High performance access to file storage

Child truancy alerts and virtual tour of colleges or universities for teenagers are among the most wanted online services, according to a survey commissioned by Directgov.

The Central Office of Information said the study, which questioned more than 2,000 adults and a representative sample of 14 to 18-year-olds, will be used to help the assess the next stage of development for the central portal for government.

Published yesterday, the survey also found that a guide to local services was top of the wish list for the over 50s, while motorists most wanted the ability to renew car tax online.

Both services are already available on Directgov – with the latter having migrated from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency's website – suggesting that work is still needed to communicate the availability of such services to the public. The top desire for disabled people was personalised journey planners mapped by accessibility.

Staying connected with family and friends was a key theme revealed across all sample groups. In addition to receiving immediate online alerts if their child has failed to turn up for registration, parents wanted to be able to track children's movements outside of school for safety.

Meanwhile, one in six over 50s most want to stay in better touch with friends and family via webcams and video conferencing.

Teenagers, who often rely on social networking sites and instant messaging to keep in touch with friends, also see the internet as a tool for self-improvement. Almost a fifth of those surveyed wanted the chance to take virtual tours of colleges and universities, while the same proportion wanted to take virtual driving lessons.

For motorists, responsible driving was the top priority. One in ten wanted to put their car through a virtual MOT, while one in seven wanted to be able to calculate the exact carbon emissions of their vehicle.

For disabled people, the most desired future services are those which allow them more time and freedom, with one in seven 35 to 44-year-olds wanting to have face-to-face meetings, such as job interviews or benefit claims renewals, online.

The results of the survey, conducted by ICM Research, are currently being analysed before Directgov decides on how they might be implemented into its website strategy.

Commenting on the findings, the organisation's chief executive officer Jayne Nickalls said: "With 60 per cent of respondents saying they want more government services in one place online, all of the insights we gained will be taken into consideration as we plan the future of Directgov."

Under the online streamlining programme, at least 551 government websites are being culled, with relevant information transferred to "supersites" like Directgov.

This article was originally published at Kablenet.

Kablenet's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
Lavabit loses contempt of court appeal over protecting Snowden, customers
Judges rule complaints about government power are too little, too late
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
Edward Snowden on his Putin TV appearance: 'Why all the criticism?'
Denies Q&A cameo was meant to slam US, big-up Russia
Judge halts spread of zombie Nortel patents to Texas in Google trial
Epic Rockstar patent war to be waged in California
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Reprieve for Weev: Court disowns AT&T hacker's conviction
Appeals court strikes down landmark sentence
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.