Feeds

BMA calls for unity amidst MTAS fallout

Watch out, the men in white coats are coming

Seven Steps to Software Security

The new president of the British Medical Association (BMA), Parveen Kumar, has penned an open letter outlining what the organisation will do to try and sort out the mess of the online application system for doctors.

Previous president James Johnston resigned after a letter he wrote to The Times failed to reflect the anger felt by many doctors over the problems with the Department of Health's flailing system.

Patricia Hewitt was forced to ditch the Medical Training Application Service (MTAS) last month.

The letter asked all BMA members to fill in an online survey as to what the new system should look like. The organisation is preparing to give evidence to the Tooke Inquiry, which will look at what went wrong with the system and likely propose an alternative for next year.

But many junior doctors feel the BMA has failed to do enough to express doctors' anger.

The open letter points out that the BMA has been raising concerns about junior doctors' training since 2004. In the summer of 2006 it called for a delay in moving to the new system.

The letter calls for doctors to stand together.

It said: "There is a great danger that the profession ends up fighting amongst itself rather than doing everything we can, collectively, to find the best solution to a bad situation."

Presumably, this is aimed at organisations like junior doctors' group Remedy UK which has taken a harder line against MTAS.

Remedy UK took the Department of Health to the High Court over the project's failure.

Some 12,000 doctors are expected to be without jobs or training posts as a result of the project's failure.

The BMA letter is here.

There's more from NHS Blogger here. ®

The Power of One Infographic

More from The Register

next story
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Delaware pair nabbed for getting saucy atop Mexican eatery
Burrito meets soft taco in alleged rooftop romp outrage
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.