Feeds
80%
Sharp LC37XD1E HD TV

Sharp Aquos LC37XD1E 37in HD TV

There's high-definition and then there's high-definition

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Sharp LC37XD1E HD TV - "The Matrix" image copyright Warner Brothers

Slightly more disappointing is the shared Component-video and VGA port - you can only use it for one or the other, with a supplied adapter for Component-video input. The audio input is also a 3.5mm headphone connector, rather than phono, which is more common on A/V kit. There are two Scarts for your SD sources, but only one supports RGB, and there's also an S-Video connector.

Despite its 1,920 x 1,080 resolution, it's limited to just 1,280 x 1,024 when using the VGA port, which seems a fairly needless restriction.

The LC37XD1E includes a feature called Optical Picture Control that allows it to adjust the backlight to best suit its surroundings. There's a sensor on the front and when the light level in the room changes it will adjust the display to suit. It's a nice option that works well, saving you from having to constantly tweak the backlight settings.

Audio reproduction was decent, if a little lacking in bass. There is also a clear voice option for boosting dialogue, so you can lower the volume overall and still make out what people are saying.

The design is pleasant enough to look at finished in sleek shiny black plastic and with hidden speakers. The stand is inconspicuous and attaches to the display body via four bolts. It's not too large for a 37in model, measuring 92 x 66 x 12cm. The remote control feels nice and substantial with a sensible button layout that doesn't leave you hunting for commonly used items.

The recommended of price of £1,249 is quite high, but hunt around online and you should be able to pick one up for around £1,000, which is reasonable for a Full HD set of this quality.

Verdict

If you're a fan of HD DVD or Blu-ray, then it makes sense to opt for a TV that can display the material at its best - and the LC37XD1E is more than capable in this regard. The lack of dedicated Component-video input and hobbled VGA resolution are annoying though. It'll do its best to make the most of SD material, but unfortunately it can only do so much and it'll soon having you wishing there was more HD content out there.

The essential guide to IT transformation

80%
Sharp LC37XD1E HD TV

Sharp Aquos LC37XD1E 37in HD TV

To maximise HD DVD or Blu-ray you'll need a Full HD set, the LC37XD1E makes HD look fantastic
Price: £1,249 ($2,467/€1,836) RRP

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch
Full specs for wrist-mounted device here ... but who'll buy it?
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?