Feeds

HP grants little telcos NonStop rights

Pay less for the very best

High performance access to file storage

HP wants to give the poor, huddled masses of telecommunications companies in developing countries a chance to buy its very best gear. So, the vendor today rolled out the NonStop NS3000AC server - a more moderately priced, always on system.

The new box stands as HP's very first NonStop server targeted at small- to mid-sized customers in "emerging markets" such as Eastern Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America. To craft an affordable box for this crowd, HP has basically stripped out a lot of the components needed to meet NEBS compliance - a telco standard that ensures hardware can withstand harsh conditions such as earthquakes or extreme temperatures. The end result is a server that starts around $350,000 instead of $500,000 as with typical NonStop telco gear.

"These new servers are designed for smaller operations that are coming under increasing competitive pressure to up their availability," said Bob Kossler, a director of product management at HP.

The NonStop line, which made its way to HP via Tandem and Compaq, has long proved popular with telcos, financial institutions and others that demand resilient servers. As Kossler noted, HP now believes that smaller telcos are willing to pay for such performance as well, since their customers have started to expect always available wireless service, for example. Heck, maybe some massive US telcos will shell out for the new systems, so that our cell phones can work all the time too.

As the name indicates, the NS3000AC is an AC powered box. The base model system ships with 1.6GHz (6MB of cache) single core versions of Intel's "Montecito" flavor of Itanium. Customers will find one chip per 2U blade module, with a minimum configuration of two blade modules. They can then expand with up to four of the blade modules (8U) per 42U rack. You can compare the configurations and other telco systems here.

Customers can outfit the server with between 4GB and 8GB of memory and connect up to 9TB of disk.

Along with the hardware, HP bundles the NonStop operating system, some telco middleware and a SQL/MX database. The company reckons that the software trappings should make life easier on smaller customers as well.

"We provide the entire infrastructure immediately, and you just think about what applications to run on it" Kossler said. "It's pretty much plug and play."

Isn't it always? ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.