Feeds

HP marries Cisco's Infiniband switches with clusters and blades

And clusters made of blades

High performance access to file storage

HP has added more Cisco networking gear options to its pre-packaged cluster product line.

First off, HP's customers can now pick up Cisco's double data rate (DDR) InfiniBand-based Server Fabric Switches (SFS). Many of you will know this Cisco kit as the hardware once sold by start-up Topspin, which Cisco swallowed in 2005. The switches should provide a nice low-latency option.

Secondly, HP's c-Class blade servers now support Cisco's InfiniBand host driver software. Three cheers for lower latency and high bandwidth once again.

"The Cisco InfiniBand HPC drivers work with the HP 4X DDR IB Mezzanine Host Channel Adapters (HCAs) within BladeSystem c-Class blade servers," the companies said. "The c-Class systems are then connected with 20 Gbps per line rate InfiniBand uplinks to SFS 7000 series InfiniBand fixed and modular switching chassis, as part of larger InfiniBand HPC clusters. These clusters enable high performance and scalability for message-passing distributed-parallel applications with all the advantages of HP BladeSystem."

HP has long supported the old Topspin gear with its clusters. So, the meat of this week's announcement seems to come from HP tying Cisco's hardware to its pre-packaged Unified Cluster Portfolio (UCP) and to its relatively new c-Class blade servers.

The UCP systems are aimed at corporate customers and researchers who want high performance computing (HPC) muscle but don't want to deal with crafting their own clusters.

"The HP 4X DDR IB Mezzanine interface card, now bundled with Cisco InfiniBand drivers, enables HP BladeSystem c-Class servers to use Cisco Linux-based Commercial IB fabrics, Cisco Linux-based Open Fabrics Enterprise Edition IB fabrics and Cisco Windows-based IB fabrics (Windows driver availability expected this fall)," the companies added. "These drivers work with the Cisco InfiniBand Fabric Manager to deliver high scalability, high performance and high reliability."

Have at it, kids. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.