Feeds

Mobile phone rays paralyse cars

If that's not sinister, we don't know what is

The Power of One Infographic

Nissan has warned its customers not to let their keyless-entry devices touch cellphones, according to reports.

The company has found that RF emissions during an incoming or outgoing call can wipe the memory of the electronic "I-keys" supplied with two of its flagship models.

"We discovered that if the I-Key touches a cellphone...calls have the potential to alter the electronic code inside the I-Key," a Nissan spokesman told Reuters yesterday. The car manufacturer has asked customers to keep their phones at least an inch away from their car keys.

Failure to follow the advice could leave drivers unable to start or unlock their cars. Once the key is scrambled, "the car won't start and the I-Key cannot be reprogrammed", according to Nissan.

The technical glitch could have a wider impact than ire among a limited number of motorists. The radio-waves-melt-childrens-heads tendency will no doubt seize upon it with glee; and of course any proper tinfoil-clad conspiracy connoisseur will view this news as downright sinister.

After all, it's already known that the (doubtless alien-controlled) spooks can use your mobile phone to destroy your car with a robot-launched assassination missile (no, really, apart from the aliens: details low down on this page). But now they might conceivably have subtler methods at their disposal.

The models in question are the 2007 Altima and Infiniti G35, widely sold in North America. Owners are being notified of the problem by email, and will be able to get fresh I-keys from dealers in the event of a problem. A new pattern of keyless-entry device will be available later in the year.

More from Reuters here. ®

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
Google Nest, ARM, Samsung pull out Thread to strangle ZigBee
But there's a flaw in Google's IP-based IoT system
US freemium mobile network eyes up Europe
FreedomPop touts 'free' calls, texts and data
'Two-speed internet' storm turns FCC.gov into zero-speed website
Deadline for comments on net neutrality shake-up extended to Friday
Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup
Just hook us up to more 10Gbps ports, backbone biz yells in tit-for-tat spat
Want to beat Verizon's slow Netflix? Get a VPN
Exec finds stream speed climbs when smuggled out
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.