Feeds

Straight blokes best at reading maps

But don't ask them to find the car keys

Security for virtualized datacentres

Straight blokes are best at reading maps, but if you want to know where you left the car keys, you'd best ask a woman, a new study has revealed.

According to The Telegraph, researchers at the University of Warwick probed "how we perform mental tasks in light of sexual preferences", and found that the map reading ability league table is topped by heterosexual males, followed by gay men, lesbians, and heterosexual women, in that order.

However, while "men outperformed women on tests such as mentally rotating objects and matching angles", women trumped the chaps when it came to verbal dexterity and remembering objects' locations.

The study culled data from 198,000 people aged 20-65 years (109,612 men and 88,509 women) who participated in an online BBC poll. Another illuminating finding was that men's minds decline faster than women's, and the rate of atrophy was the same for heterosexuals and homosexuals alike.

Prof Elizabeth Maylor of the University of Warwick said: "This is a novel finding. Only gender has an effect on rate of ageing, not sexual orientation."

Novel it may be, but we're all going to lose our marbles sooner or later, as Maylor explained: "In all the tasks, older people did worse than younger people, whether male or female. In fact, for some of the tasks, people in their 30s were significantly worse than people in their 20s. This is one of the first times that age-related decline has been shown in adults under 40."

Maylor did, however, offer a ray of hope with the suggestion that "practice and mental exercise can slow down the rate of decline, whether you're male or female".

The full findings of the survey are published in the Archives of Sexual Behaviour. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Boffins who stare at goats: I do believe they’re SHRINKING
Alpine chamois being squashed by global warming
What's that STINK? Rosetta probe shoves nose under comet's tail
Rotten eggs, horse dung and almonds – yuck
Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill
Hiding from this space pimple isn't going to do humanity's reputation any good
Kip Thorne explains how he created the black hole for Interstellar
Movie special effects project spawns academic papers on gravitational lensing
Experts brand LOHAN's squeaky-clean box
Phytosanitary treatment renders Vulture 2 crate fit for export
LONG ARM of the SAUR: Brachially gifted dino bone conundrum solved
Deinocheirus mirificus was a bit of a knuckle dragger
Moment of truth for LOHAN's servos: Our US allies are poised for final test flight
Will Vulture 2 freeze at altitude? Edge Research Lab to find out
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.