Feeds

Malware targets OpenOffice users

BadBunny

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Malware miscreants have crafted a cross-platform worm targeted at OpenOffice users that's capable of infecting Windows, Mac, and Linux computers.

The OpenOffice/StarBasic macro worm, dubbed BadBunny, is a proof-of-concept worm that's not been seen outside the lab. Most anti-virus firms describe it as a low-risk threat.

OpenOffice users are liable to get infected if they open an OpenOffice Draw file called badbunny.odg. If open, the file downloads and displays a pornographic jpg image of a man dressed as a rabbit making the beast with two backs with a scantily clad woman in a woodland setting.

How very fur-verted.

Meanwhile, a macro included in this payload performs different functions depending on whether victims are running Windows, MacOS, or Linux. On Windows, for example, a JavaScript virus is executed and a mIRC script is run. Linux boxes are infected with a tiny Perl script and an XChat script. Mac OS systems are infected with a Ruby script virus.

The dropped XChat and mIRC scripts are used to replicate in an attempt to distribute the virus. Sections of the code also attempt to knock out access to anti-virus websites.

The malware was writen by the d00mriderz VX team, a group that's written StarOffice malware in the past. The Stardust virus, created by the same group in May 2006, tried to download a picture of porn star Silvia Saint. BadBunny is the most complex sample of such malware to date and the first that attempts to infect multiple system platforms, at least in theory.

"The hackers have written plenty of StarBasic malware in the past, but the most 'in the wild' this one is likely to get is by displaying a picture of a furvert in the woods," said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant for Sophos.

"This is old-school malware - seemingly written to show off a proof of concept rather than a serious attempt to spy on and steal from computer users. A financially motivated hacker would have targeted more widely used software and not incorporated such a bizarre image." ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.