Feeds

IBM polishes grid for healthcare providers

It's only May and they're celebrating GMAS?

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

IBM is souping up its grid storage system aimed at healthcare service providers struggling to store a veritable data deluge of medical imagery.

The Grid Medical Archive Solution (GMAS) uses grid computing — that's lots of linked computers sharing processing power and resources — to store and manage patient data. GMAS comes as a pre-packaged with storage systems, software, System x 3650 servers and, of course, IBM Global Services members on call.

IBM unveiled the latest update to GMAS at the American Telemedicine Association show today. The fresh revision features hardware upgrades and the latest version of Grid Access Manager storage management software, which expands compatibility beyond IBM's DS4000 storage hardware to the newer (and cheaper) EXP3000 line and even EMC's storage offerings.

IBM has entered an OEM contract with Vancouver-based Bycast for the Grid Access Manager software, putting the entire GMAS package under the support umbrella of IBM — giving customers just one neck to choke should something go wrong.

Business-line exec for IBM Craig Butler said grid storage provides a solution for hospitals, clinics and research institutions that not only need to store massive amounts of business-critical fixed-content data for long periods of time but also need to be able to retrieve that data 24/7 from multiple sites.

Hospitals often need to save image data from multitudes of MRIs, excesses of x-rays and a plethora of PET scans for decades or even in perpetuity. Then there's the whole Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements for medical data to worry about. All this, of course, presents a storage management problem for health care organizations.

GMAS helps out by creating a virtual, shared storage pool across locations and storage hardware brands. Users can spread archived data between multiple sites — a useful feature for your friendly neighborhood consolidated hospital.

None of this comes cheap, however. The bare-bones package starts at around $250,000 for 12Tb of storage and four System x servers. From there, the price goes up by the terabyte.

Turn your head and cough.

GMAS shares the market with HP's Medical Archive Solution and EMC's Centera. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.