Feeds

Consumers more excited by GPS than mobile TV

Not getting lost more important than Lost

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Mobile TV is getting a lukewarm reception among consumers, with more mobile users expressing an interest in getting their phone kitted out with GPS technology.

According to Canalys' new consumer mobility survey, some 51 per cent of those surveyed in Europe said they were interested in mobile TV - as long as there was a diverse range of content available. This leaves almost half of those surveyed with no interest in the service, regardless of its cost.

This goes against recent research carried out by Screen Digest, which predicted that mobile TV would outstrip rival services in terms of revenue generation. That report claimed mobile TV is set to generate €4.7bn in revenue from 140 million subscribers by 2011, despite the fact the service is currently only available in a handful of markets.

Back to the Canalys report - of those interested in mobile TV, 29 per cent said they would opt to tune in to live sports events or reality shows. Almost a quarter of respondents expressed an interest in content relating to hobbies or personal interests that they could not get at home, and a similar proportion were keen in having access to exactly the same channels as they had at home.

"When asked what types of mobile TV programming they would be interested in, consumers' preferences are quite diverse, and there is unlikely to be one type of killer content," said analyst Adrian Drozd. "This suggests many different content partnerships and charging models may be required, which will add complexity for users and for the operators developing such services."

Meanwhile, some 62 per cent of mobile users said built-in satellite navigation would be a useful addition to their mobile phones. "Consumers are much more excited by the prospect of having GPS on the handset than mobile TV," said Pete Cunningham, senior analyst at Canalys.

"For advertising-supported services, the survey showed higher interest around vehicle and pedestrian navigation, mobile e-mail and IM than for TV. It shouldn't come as a great surprise that mobile propositions with location or communication at their core resonate the strongest with consumers."

Canalys' research also revealed that Apple is gaining popularity as a phone provider, with close to half of iPod owners surveyed saying they would consider buying the iPhone as their next handset.

Nokia is still the leading mobile phone choice however, with 84 per cent of survey respondents saying they were more likely than not to consider buying the brand. This was followed by Sony Ericsson, Samsung and Motorola.

Apple ranked in the middle of the table, above smart mobile device manufacturers like RIM, HP and Palm.

"Apple's rating improves dramatically when you talk to existing iPod owners," said Cunningham. "Almost half the respondents who owned an iPod rated Apple as more likely than not be considered for their next phone, compared to just 20 per cent for those who didn't have an iPod, and they were five times as likely to give Apple the highest rating. There is a lot of loyalty there that Apple can tap into."

Copyright © 2007, ENN

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Vulture 2 takes a battering in 100km/h test run
Still in one piece, but we're going to need MORE POWER
TRIANGULAR orbits will help Rosetta to get up close with Comet 67P
Probe will be just 10km from Space Duck in October
Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away
Bizarre-looking creature actually related to velvet worms
CRR-CRRRK, beep, beep: Mars space truck backs out of slippery sand trap
Curiosity finds new drilling target after course correction
What does a flashmob of 1,024 robots look like? Just like this
Sorry, Harvard, did you say kilobots or KILLER BOTS?
NASA's rock'n'roll shock: ROLLING STONE FOUND ON MARS
No sign of Ziggy Stardust and his band
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
Vulture 2 spaceplane autopilot brain surgery a total success
LOHAN slips into some sexy bespoke mission parameters
LOHAN acquires aircraft arboreal avoidance algorithm acronyms
Is that an ARMADILLO in your PANTS or are you just pleased to see me?
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.