Feeds

French outwhine Brits in the workplace

Bah, we can't even moan properly any more

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

The French have confirmed their position as the world's top workplace whiners, beating whinging Brits into second place on the international scale of dissatisfaction.

Research group FDS probed 14,000 moaning employees in 23 countries and rated their overall "whinginess" on various factors, including "percentage of workers unhappy with pay, actual income relative to cost of living, percentage of workers who feel work impinges on private life, and average weekly working hours".

Our Gallic cousins bellyached their way to top spot, leaving the UK sharing second spot with the Swedes, and the US putting in a good effort in fourth. Rather happier workers were found in The Netherlands, Thailand, and "least whingy" Ireland.

While UK employees will doubtless bemoan at some length the loss of national prestige caused by French complaining, it's nonetheless an impressive performance. Specifically, 37 per cent of Brits moan they don't get enough holidays - the highest percentage in Europe. Forty per cent reckon they don't get paid enough, and a fifth believe "having to care for children, the time it takes to commute to work, and not enjoying the work they do are issues for them in the workplace".

FDS managing director Charlotte Cornish offered: "After the French, British employees are the most likely to be dissatisfied with their work situation, despite their relative good fortune. It's also interesting to note that after France, Britain and Sweden, the world's biggest workplace whingers are Americans, despite their having by far the highest levels of income relative to their cost of living.

"Compare them to Thai workers: while real levels of income are more than eight times higher in the States, more workers in the US feel their pay is a problem than in Thailand."

The top 10 whiners worldwide are: 1 France, =2 UK, =2 Sweden, 4 USA, =5 Australia, =5 Portugal, =7 Canada, =7 Greece, 9 Poland, =10 Germany, =10 Spain. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.