Feeds

Apple tweaks MacBook specs

802.11n now a feature not an upgrade

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Apple has updated its MacBook line of consumer computers, upping the processor specifications, setting the base-line memory configuration to 1GB and making 802.11n wireless networking a feature rather than an upgrade.

As before, there are three models: two white and one black. All three sport a 13.3in, 1280 x 800 glossy widescreen display; 1GB of 667MHz DDR 2 memory; Gigabit Ethernet; 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi; in integrated webcam; one Firewire and two USB ports; and Bluetooth 2.0. All of them use the on-chipset Intel GMA 950 graphics engine.

The first white MacBook has a 2GHz Core 2 Duo processor, an 80GB hard drive and a DVD-ROM/CD-RW optical unit. The second white MacBook has a 2.16GHz processor, 120GB hard drive and 8x DVD writer. The black machine has the same spec but for a 160GB hard drive.

There's no reference in the specs to LED-backlit displays suggesting this promised feature is indeed being reserved for a MacBook Pro update.

Prices for the three models are £699/$1099, £829/$1299 and £949/$1499, so no substantial change there. All three MacBooks are available immediately, Apple said.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.