Feeds

Roche exposes medical details on website

Testing times

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

The medical testing arm of pharmaceutical giant Roche has exposed the personal and medical details of UK customers on its website. The firm has admitted the security breach but has not explained how it happened.

Customers who had registered their details with Roche Diagnostics received the first edition of an email newsletter on Wednesday which included a link via which they could update their personal details.

Users who clicked on that link were directed to a Roche website which displayed the details of someone else.

"I saw the details of the same person several times, then it changed and I saw another person's details several times," said Tim Trent, a newsletter recipient who is also a marketing and privacy specialist. "In all I saw six other people's details."

Trent informed the people whose details he saw and the firm, having received the email on Wednesday morning. Roche spokeswoman Hazel Clarke said that the link was deactivated later that morning.

"We did have that issue this week, on Wednesday," said Clarke. "When we became aware of it we immediately acted to rectify the problem. It lasted for a number of minutes, maybe 90 minutes at most."

Clarke was unable to say how many people had had their details exposed or had seen the personal details of others. She did not say how the breach had happened or how many people the email was sent to.

"The main issue to do with details was stopped immediately and beyond that we need to ensure doesn't happen again, and that is what we are working on now," she said.

The email was in relation to the Accu-Chek range of diabetes testing products.

Trent said he had made a formal complaint to the Information Commissioner's Office. "Some of the details I could access showed that a person was on a particular kind of drug treatment, which isn't good news," said Trent. "Loads of people follow the exhortation to register with Roche Diagnostics, and probably even gave consent to email marketing. But we didn't give them consent to have their data records on public display."

Copyright © 2007, OUT-LAW.com

OUT-LAW.COM is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
One HUNDRED FAMOUS LADIES exposed NUDE online
Celebrity women victimised as Apple iCloud accounts reportedly popped
Rubbish WPS config sees WiFi router keys popped in seconds
Another day, another way in to your home router
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records
'Federated search' spaffed info all over Five Eyes chums
Three quarters of South Korea popped in online gaming raids
Records used to plunder game items, sold off to low lifes
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.