Feeds

Migration tool builder eyes up broader market

Celona plans to move beyond telco roots

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

DW Blog With release 3.1 of its Celona migration tool, Celona Technologies claims to be a step nearer providing complete automation of data migration projects. At the same time, it plans to extend its patent migration technology to a broader business market.

Celona's migration tool was originally built to support complex data migration projects in the rapidly-changing telco sector. The tool automates many of the tasks associated with large-scale business transformation projects, such as billing consolidation prompted by the proliferation of new telecoms products.

"Telcos have traditionally taken a long time to launch new products - even a simple tariff change can take months. But with de-regulation and new entrants to the market, they must speed up the process and consolidate their systems. Celona's technology enables them to do this," explains Paul Hollingsworth, the company’s director of product marketing.

Traditional data migration tools such as data warehousing are not, he suggests, advanced enough for the complex projects in the telecoms sector. "We use a multi-layer approach to model and synchronise the physical, logical and procedural aspects of a transformation. This means, for example, that we can pass data back to old systems to keep them running through the transition period. We can also accommodate changes to strategy which may occur during the transition and control the granularity of data down to a low level."

The robust technology embedded in the Celona tools is attracting attention outside of the telco sector and the company has long term plans to expand into other sectors with finance high on the list.

"As a small company we have to focus our marketing efforts and currently we are concentrating on the telecoms sector. But once the momentum has been established there we will actively start searching for new markets in the coming year. We have already had some cold calls from financial institutions so there could be opportunities there," says Hollingsworth. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
AWS pulls desktop-as-a-service from the PC
Support for PCoIP protocol means zero clients can run cloudy desktops
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.