Feeds

Sun plans 'consumer-friendly' Java SE

Shrink fit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

JavaOne Sun Microsystems is introducing changes to Java, boosting speed and improving flexibility for deployment on PCs and consumer-facing devices.

Java Standard Edition (Java SE) 7.0 will feature a special Consumer Java Runtime Environment for desktop Java applications to "start from cold very quickly", the company said Tuesday.

Sun said it's revamping the "install experience to bring a more consumer focus to the desktop". It's not clear whether the consumer runtime will supplant or exist with Java SE's existing runtime.

Also planned is modularisation of the JRE so devices can run the minimum number of applications and instructions with other code "downloaded in parallel".

"This should bring a lot of relief and excitement to the desktop," Java SE platform lead Danny Coward told Sun's annual JavaOne conference.

Changes to JavaSE will feed into GlassFish - Java SE is the basis application server from Sun and rivals. Sun promised a 100 kilobyte kernel in the upcoming GlassFish 3.0, to speed start-up and performance on devices with limited processing and memory capacity. Developers will also be able to dynamically add and remove additional packages to expand the kernel's functionality.

Developers shouldn't hold their breath for these changes appearing any time soon. Senior staff engineer Jerome Dochez said squeezing Glassfish down involved a "big reworking of the application server" and "we are not so far fully Java compliant."

Other changes to Java SE 7.0 focus on improved scripting language support and management. Sun will re-work the Java Archive (JAR) file format for clean installation, and to highlight dependencies on other libraries or code, with something it's calling a "superJAR".

The focus on Java SE comes as Sun announced JavaFX Script and JavaFX Mobile to develop and run multimedia content on mobile phones. Sun appears to believe JavaFX Script and JavaFX Mobile will exist in parallel to Java ME - the current Java platform for mobile devices.

By shrinking core Java SE elements to fit, Sun believes it can bring some more desktop-like richness and functionality to mobile computing without overloading the device's hardware. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really
Windows NEIN skipped, tech preview due out on Wednesday
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
'Google is NOT the gatekeeper to the web, as some claim'
Plus: 'Pretty sure iOS 8.0.2 will just turn the iPhone into a fax machine'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.