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Subbuteo comes to mobile phones

Let your fingers do the kicking

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Selatra Games has announced the availability of Subbuteo Mobile, bringing stretched felt and little plastic men to the mobile phone with a licensed implementation of the turn-based soccer game.

For anyone whose youth didn't involve flicking little models of Martin Peters, while accidentally crushing Eddie Bovington under a misplaced elbow, Subbuteo is a tabletop game where players take turns flicking their carefully-collected players in an attempt to project a miniature football into the opposition goal.

Quite how that translates onto the very small screen isn't clear, but a turn-based football game should be very playable, and not having to animate the players' legs can only help reduce the processing load on the phone.

Subbuteo is currently owned by Hasbro, and the development of the game was done by Creative North Studios, but Selatra is the licensee and will be handling distribution in its 55 countries of operation.

Creative North CEO Phil Mundy said: "You don't have to be familiar with the original game to play it." ®

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