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Samsung sends usable UMPC to USA

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Samsung has launched its second-generation UMPC, the Q1 Ultra, in the US - two months after the device was unveiled at the CeBIT show in Germany.

Samsung Q1 Ultra UMPC - Spider-man 3 image courtesy Sony Pictures

This time, Samsung was able to confirm the machine is based on Intel's 'Stealy' processor, a version of the old 'Dothan' Pentium M dusted off for use in UMPCs. At the Q1 Ultra's first appearance, Intel had yet to launch the chip, preventing Samsung exectives from talking about it.

US buyers get a choice of two Q1 Ultras: one model has a 600MHz processor, the other an 800MHz CPU. Both have 1GB of DDR 2 memory, 802.11b/g Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.0 and the option to buy an add-on HSDPA 3G module - handy for video-calling with the front-mounted 0.3-megapixel camera. There's a 1.3-megapixel camera on the back of the handheld.

However, the Q1 Ultra's major improvements over the old Q1 are a bigger display - still physically 7in in the diagonal, but now with a native resolution of 1024 x 600 - and the inclusion of a micro-keyboard, split into two banks of keys, each either side of the display. The display uses a power-efficient LED backlight too.

Samsung Q1 Ultra UMPC

Q1 Ultra prices start at $799, and the various configurations are available through a range of well-known US retailers.

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