Feeds

YouTube under fire from footballers, Thailand

Copyright cases continue

Boost IT visibility and business value

The UK's Premier League is suing YouTube for showing clips of football matches.

The soccer body has filed for "a copyright infringement class action" to stop YouTube showing its clips and those of other rights holders. Music publisher Bourne and Co is joining the case, which has been filed in New York.

For anyone else keen to get involved, a website has been set up to collect other litigants for the class action - there's more here.

The complaint filed in the Southern District Court of New York says: "Defendants are pursuing a deliberate strategy of engaging in, permitting, encouraging, and facilitating massive copyright infringment on the YouTube website because the presence of large amounts of valuable intellectual property generates interest in that website."

The filing lists 16 matches played in April 2007. Bourne and Co mentions songs including Inka Dinka Doo, Let's Fall in Love, and Smile.

But footballers are not the only ones taking action: Thailand is launching legal action against the video site over claims it posted a video which insulted the Thai King - a serious offence in Thailand which can earn you up to 75 years in prison. A Swiss man was recently sentenced to 10 years for painting over a poster of the king, but was later pardoned.

Communications and Information Technology minister Sitthichai Pookaiyaudom said he would push for criminal charges against the company on Friday. He will ask for "a petition to the criminal court for emergency protection", according to the Bangkok Post. The Ministry is considering whether it can file charges in an international court.

Thai authorities say if Google can remove links from its search engine at the behest of Chinese authorities then it should do the same when Thailand acts to protect the image of its king.

In other news, allegedly soon-to-be former Prime Minister Tony Blair has recorded his first YouTube clip - recording a message of congratulations to new French President Nicholas Sarkozy.

Blair, or at least his flunkies, have set up a YouTube channel for the departing PM. Blair posted two messages congratulating Sarkozy - one in English and one in French, the French version a minute longer than the English. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
China hopes home-grown OS will oust Microsoft
Doesn't much like Apple or Google, either
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Fast And Furious 6 cammer thrown in slammer for nearly three years
Man jailed for dodgy cinema recording of Hollywood movie
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?