Feeds

MoD to publish secret UFO files

Tinfoil mob likely unruffled by flimsy cover story

High performance access to file storage

The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) plans to release its classified files regarding UFO sightings to the public.

According to an article in yesterday's Guardian, the MoD will publish its files dating back to 1967 "within weeks", following the French government's decision to do so in March.

David Clarke, a lecturer in journalism at Sheffield Hallam University and author of Flying Saucerers: A Social History of UFOlogy, reckoned that opening the MoD's files could calm down the conspiracy theorists. "The more of this stuff that they put on their website or put in the national archives, the less it will cost the taxpayer, because at the moment people are writing in about individual incidents and they are having to respond," he told the Guardian.

In fact, it seems unlikely that any true conspiracy theorist worth his tinfoil hat would be pacified by anything short of spaceships and dead aliens on display in the Science Museum - and even then there would surely be some asserting that the real good stuff was being kept hidden.

In particular, a lot of people believe that the UK's version of Area 51/Roswell took place at Rendlesham Forest in 1980. The MoD has already made available reams of old bumf covering the incident, much of which is splendid conspiracy fodder: mysterious glowing objects, farm animals going into a frenzy, curious depressions left in the ground. And - aha! - cameras recording the air-defence radar picture were switched off at the time. If that's not evidence of a secret government conspiracy, we don't know what is. Even better, there is talk of heightened radiation levels in the forest.

It's hard to imagine any new documentation convincing people that nothing happened there. If the MoD is lucky it might see a slight drop in Freedom of Information Act requests and general time wasting, but quite likely not. As the Air Staff officer who handles such requests revealed last year, the level of public interest in UFOs is much more affected by the film industry than it is by anything that the MoD or (presumably) even the aliens may get up to. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Elon Musk's LEAKY THRUSTER gas stalls Space Station supply run
Helium seeps from Falcon 9 first stage, delays new legs for NASA robonaut
Solar-powered aircraft unveiled for round-the-world flight
It's going to be a slow and sleepy flight for the pilots
Russian deputy PM: 'We are coming to the Moon FOREVER'
Plans to annex Earth's satellite with permanent base by 2030
LOHAN's Punch and Judy show relaunches Thursday
Weather looking good for second pop at test flights
Saturn spotted spawning new FEMTO-MOON
Icy 'Peggy' looks to be leaving the outer rings
Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years
Alloy, Alloy: Boffins in speed-classification breakthrough
India's GPS alternative launches second satellite
Closed satnav system due to have all seven birds aloft by 2016
Curiosity finds not-very-Australian-shaped rock on Mars
File under 'messianic pastries' and move on, people
Top Secret US payload launched into space successfully
Clandestine NRO spacecraft sets off on its unknown mission
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.