Feeds

Study: Idiots may cause data-center apocalypse

Ill-conceived moves to blade servers cause outage 'crisis'

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

A new study warns that ignorant data center managers switching to high-density devices are facing a "capacity crisis" that may increase the number of costly server outages.

The Aperture Research Institute, a division of software company Aperture Technologies, surveyed over 100 enterprise data managers, representing over 600 data centers covering industries such as banking, data services, retail, insurance and telecommunications.

Almost 90 per cent of those surveyed said that their racks are already three-quarters full. This severe lack of real-estate is making high-density blade servers more appealing.

But with the greater complexity of blade servers and their intense demands of power and cooling, the risk of failure is also on the rise.

"Data centers are facing a time of crisis because of the increased demands on their physical resources and management," VP of marketing at Aperture, Steve Yellen said. "There's a gap between IT and data center facilities that's resulting in a rapid increase in high density equipment without thinking about the ability of a data center to reliably support that capacity. With these data centers stretching thinner and thinner, more and more instances of downtime and failure are likely to occur."

The survey found that over 57 per cent of of respondents cited human error as a leading cause of outages. Aperture worries that switching to long division while many are still counting on their fingers and toes is a recipe for a server outage sandwich.

Over 21 per cent of professionals surveyed are blissfully unaware of their maximum power density per rack. Over 18 percent didn't know what their average power density is. With more weight, heat and stress and power density per rack demanded by blades, Aperture argues this kilowatt apathy could lead to critical downtime.

You can take a gander at Aperture's findings yourself in PDF form.

Grain of salt

It should be noted that Aperture Technologies just so happens to have a data center infrastructure management suite available. Fancy that. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.