Feeds

Study: Idiots may cause data-center apocalypse

Ill-conceived moves to blade servers cause outage 'crisis'

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

A new study warns that ignorant data center managers switching to high-density devices are facing a "capacity crisis" that may increase the number of costly server outages.

The Aperture Research Institute, a division of software company Aperture Technologies, surveyed over 100 enterprise data managers, representing over 600 data centers covering industries such as banking, data services, retail, insurance and telecommunications.

Almost 90 per cent of those surveyed said that their racks are already three-quarters full. This severe lack of real-estate is making high-density blade servers more appealing.

But with the greater complexity of blade servers and their intense demands of power and cooling, the risk of failure is also on the rise.

"Data centers are facing a time of crisis because of the increased demands on their physical resources and management," VP of marketing at Aperture, Steve Yellen said. "There's a gap between IT and data center facilities that's resulting in a rapid increase in high density equipment without thinking about the ability of a data center to reliably support that capacity. With these data centers stretching thinner and thinner, more and more instances of downtime and failure are likely to occur."

The survey found that over 57 per cent of of respondents cited human error as a leading cause of outages. Aperture worries that switching to long division while many are still counting on their fingers and toes is a recipe for a server outage sandwich.

Over 21 per cent of professionals surveyed are blissfully unaware of their maximum power density per rack. Over 18 percent didn't know what their average power density is. With more weight, heat and stress and power density per rack demanded by blades, Aperture argues this kilowatt apathy could lead to critical downtime.

You can take a gander at Aperture's findings yourself in PDF form.

Grain of salt

It should be noted that Aperture Technologies just so happens to have a data center infrastructure management suite available. Fancy that. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Death by 1,000 cuts: Mainstream storage array suppliers are bleeding
Cloud, all-flash kit, object storage slicing away at titans of storage
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
VMware vaporises vCHS hybrid cloud service
AnD yEt mOre cRazy cAps to dEal wIth
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?