Feeds
55%
EVGA Nforce 680i LT SLI

EVGA 680i LT SLI nForce-based motherboard

Cut-down 680i - or shoved up 650i?

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Review For some time, Nvidia's 600 family of chipsets has had a gaping chasm between the nForce 650i SLI, which typically sells for £90, and the nForce 680i SLI, which starts at £165. Enter the 680i LT SLI chipset, a budget version of the 680i SLI.

EVGA Nforce 680i LT SLI
EVGA's nForce 680i LT SLI board from the front

As the name suggests, the nForce 650i SLI supports dual Nvidia graphics cards for gaming, but SLI is just about the only significant feature and even then it's the half-hearted sort with 16 PCI Express lanes assigned to the two slots.

The nForce 680i SLI has a whole host of extra features, including SLI with 16 PCIe lanes for each graphics card, plus a third graphics slot with eight PCIe lanes, which will be handy come the day games can use a third graphics card to handle physics.

The 680i increases the number of available SATA hard drive links from four ports to six, and adds support for a 1333MHz frontside bus. The number of USB ports on the I/O panel climbs from four to six and there's a second Gigabit Ethernet connection. On the board you'll likely find power and reset micro buttons along with an LED readout to display POST codes. The final addition is support for SLI memory, which can run up to 1200MHz. Not only is this maximum supported memory speed incredibly fast, but the memory can be automatically overclocked by Nvidia's nTune utility.

That's a long list of features, but it comes at a very high price, so it didn't come as a huge surprise when Nvidia launched the nForce 680i LT SLI as a lower cost alternative.

Unfortunately, we made a couple of slips of the keyboard in our news coverage so it's time to put the record straight with a comparative review using two EVGA motherboards. One is the nForce 680i SLI with revision A2 of the chipset and the other is the nForce 680i LT SLI. These rather unimaginative chipset-labels-as-EVGA-model-names are quite appropriate as these motherboards seem to follow the Nvidia reference design very closely.

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
All aboard the Poo Bus! Ding ding, route Number Two departing
Only another three days of pooing and I can have a ride!
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
Dragon Age Inquisition: Our chief weapons are...
Bioware's fantasy forces in fine fettle
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Simplify SSL certificate management across the enterprise
Simple steps to take control of SSL across the enterprise, and recommendations for a management platform for full visibility and single-point of control for these Certificates.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.