Feeds

BT brings Wii-like remote control to PCs

Shake, rattle and roll

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

UK telco British Telecom has built an add-on for laptops, tablets and ultra-mobile PCs that allows users to control their computer simply by moving it around.

Called Balance, the unit plugs into a spare USB port. Inside, it contains a set of motion sensors similar to the detectors build into Nintendo's Wii Remote game controller. Special software converts feedback from the sensors into instructions for the host machine's Windows user interface.

Tilting the screen left or right, for example, could cause the cursor to move in the appropriate direction. Shaking it vigorously up and down could be set empty the Recycle Bin or restart the machine.

BT Balance add-on motion sensor

It'd certainly make an interesting add-on for driving games, we'd say.

However, BT has more practical uses in mind, in particular new ways to help the elderly and the disabled use computers, particular mobile devices which otherwise require the user to be able to work with a tiny keyboard.

It also has its eye on field-engineers who may need to control their computers with one hand.

It's nothing new, of course. Finnish technology firm MyOrigo gave The Register a demo of a phone that uses the same principles to make calls and surf the internet back in July 2003. MyOrigo's technology has yet to come to market, though it's keen to licence it to device manufacturers.

BT's unit is a little way off too: the company said the technology is still in development and being tested in the field.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Back to the ... drawing board: 'Hoverboard' will disappoint Marty McFly wannabes
Buzzing board (and some future apps) leave a lot to be desired
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.