Feeds

Peer calls for UK cyber-crime portal

Is e-crime treated seriously by police?

Seven Steps to Software Security

A parliamentary committee set up to look at trends in cybercrime is considering the establishment of a website allowing people to report electronic crime.

Lord Broers, chairman of the science and technology select committee, said the idea is one of several his committee is considering in its study on e-crime, which is due to report in the summer. The committee will also consider whether changes in UK legislation might be needed in order to fight against hackers, VXers, phishers, and other cyber crooks.

US citizens can report cybercrime through the Internet Crime Complaint Centre, which acts as a single clearing house. Something similar in the UK would aid the fight against cybercrime.

As well as providing more accurate statistics, a UK-based cybercrime reporting website might encourage more people to come forward. Since April, people attempting to report incidents of e-crime to the police have been told to go to their banks instead. Credit card fraud is no longer a reportable offence.

Some security experts we spoke to reckon the move makes it easier to aggregate data about fraud, but Lord Broers expressed reservations about whether the change sent the wrong signals. "In the UK, people are being told to go to their bank first. We are not sure that is right. These are crimes and the police should be equipped to deal with them," Lord Broers said, the BBC reports.

Reporting electronic crime should be as simple as reporting ordinary crime. "People who, for example, have been the victim of an eBay scam tend to think how stupid they were and that there is no point in going to police. If you were mugged you would be sure to go straight to the police," he said.

Lord Broers also expressed concern that Britain no longer has a dedicated cybercrime agency since the National High Tech Crime Unit was merged with of National Crime Squad and the National Criminal Intelligence Service to form the Serious Organised Crime Agency last year. ®

The Power of One Infographic

More from The Register

next story
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Delaware pair nabbed for getting saucy atop Mexican eatery
Burrito meets soft taco in alleged rooftop romp outrage
LightSquared backer sues FCC over spectrum shindy
Why, we might as well have been buying AIR
'Two-speed internet' storm turns FCC.gov into zero-speed website
Deadline for comments on net neutrality shake-up extended to Friday
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.