Feeds

TJX finds self at bottom of 300-bank pig pile

'Negligent misrepresentation' in data handling has its costs

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Associations representing almost 300 Northeastern banks in the US say they are suing TJX Companies to recover tens of millions of dollars in damages resulting from a data breach that may have exposed more than 45m credit and debit card numbers to thieves. Additional organizations from all over the country are likely to join the suit, which will be heard in federal court in Boston and seeks class action status.

Plaintiffs in the case include the Massachusetts Bankers Associated, the Connecticut Bankers Association and the Main Association of Community Banks. They allege in a press release that the owner of retail outlets including TJ Maxx, Marshalls and HomeGoods is responsible for "dramatic costs" to banks that have been forced to reissue new cards and cover fraudulent purchases drawn on compromised accounts.

"If we're successful against TJX, the nation's major retailers will finally wake up to the fact that not protecting consumer data is an unfair trade practice and that investment in data management systems to protect consumers and shield consumers against fraud and identity theft is required," the president and CEO for one of the plaintiffs said.

TJX first disclosed the breach in January but provided painfully few details. Last month it provided an update that said it lost about 45.6m card numbers to unknown thieves who intruded on the retailing giant's networks over a span of 17 months. Personal information, often including social security numbers, for at least 451,000 individuals was also lifted.

Fraud resulting from the TJX breach has been reported from all over the world, and the plaintiffs say banks to this day continue to receive lists of cards stolen through the heist. In March, authorities in Florida detained at least six individuals suspected of using pilfered account numbers to buy gift cards at Wal-Mart and Sam's Club stores. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Russian hackers exploit 'Sandworm' bug 'to spy on NATO, EU PCs'
Fix imminent from Microsoft for Vista, Server 2008, other stuff
Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for
It's on by default – didn't you read the small print?
'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
Forget passwords, let's use SELFIES, says Obama's cyber tsar
Michael Daniel wants to kill passwords dead
Kill off SSL 3.0 NOW: HTTPS savaged by vicious POODLE
Pull it out ASAP, it is SWISS CHEESE
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.