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Fabric7 ripped apart

x86 SMP dream dies again

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Exclusive Big Opteron metal start-up Fabric7 has shut down, The Register can reveal.

Fabric7 appeared in late 2005, hoping to throw Linux (and Windows) and Opteron at the highest-end data centers tasks. It shipped eight-socket and fourteen-socket systems inside a chassis packed full of networking gear. Selling the flashy systems, however, proved tough for the young company.

The company's board decided to close up shop, according to a source, and laid off all employees last week. We were unable to reach Fabric7 officials for confirmation.

A number of x86 players have tried to hammer away at the SMP market with limited success. The vendors have looked to pull customers away from Unix on RISC systems, claiming that Linux and Windows are ready to meet the high-end challenge.

Sales of eight-socket and above x86 boxes make up just a fraction of the overall market.

We liked Fabric7's technology and were impressed with the company's executives. But the x86 SMP play still seems too immature for the market. ®

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