Feeds

Nokia's Qualcomm patent licence expires

Still to agree on replacement deal

The essential guide to IT transformation

A patent licensing agreement between Nokia and Qualcomm has expired without being renewed. The agreement is the subject of legal action in the US and Europe.

The disputes centre on patents held by Qualcomm for technology used in chips in mobile devices such as telephones.

Nokia has for some years paid a licensing fee to Qualcomm under the deal which has just expired. The two companies have not managed to agree a replacement deal.

The just-expired agreement involved the cross-licensing of technology between Qualcomm and Nokia. Nokia has just made a $20m payment to Qualcomm to cover the second quarter of this year, but Qualcomm has denounced the action, saying that it is not for Nokia to set prices for its intellectual property.

Qualcomm has asked for the American Arbitration Association to arbitrate the dispute and has demanded that Nokia continue to pay it patent licence fees.

In 2005 Nokia and others complained to the European Commission about Qualcomm's behaviour over standardisation for third generation (3G) mobile phone networks. Nokia said Qualcomm agreed that it would not over-charge for licences to its technology if it was incorporated into industry-wide standards.

Once those standards were set, argued Nokia, Qualcomm levied charges that were excessive and disproportionate. That case is ongoing.

A week later Qualcomm filed a suit in the US alleging that Nokia infringed 11 of its patents. Nokia filed another suit in Europe in recent weeks arguing that the patents on which Qualcomm's cases rest have expired in Europe.

Nokia uses chips from Texas Instruments which, in turn, use technology claimed as its own by Qualcomm. Nokia claims that the Qualcomm patents have expired.

Copyright © 2007, OUT-LAW.com

OUT-LAW.COM is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.

Related links

Nokia moves to block Qualcomm patents in Europe
Qualcomm lawsuit may be stopped, rules judge
Qualcomm infringed Broadcom patent, says ruling
Qualcomm sues Nokia in patent spat
Mobile-makers say 3G patent licensing breaks antitrust laws

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine
Activists told NOT to snap pics of staff at the concrete doughnut
What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?
Stop bitching about firearms fees - we need computerisation
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.