Feeds

Palm developing own OS - again

Full circle turned

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Palm is to build its own handheld operating system, combining a Linux foundation with the regular Palm OS look and feel. Work is clearly progressing: devices equipped with the new OS are due later this year, the company's CEO, Ed Colligan, said this week.

If all this sounds familiar, it's because it's the approach PalmSource, the Palm OS development company later acquired by Japan's Access, adopted earlier this decade. It decided to base future incarnations of the Palm OS - versions 6.0 and onward - on a Linux core surmounted by the famliar Palm user interface.

After 2005's Access acquisition, the OS was shifted further in the direction of Linux, with the operating system now known as the Access Linux Platform.

Clearly, that's not been what Palm itself wants, and having last year licensed the source code for Palm OS 5.4 - aka Garnet - from Access for $44m, the company now appears to be doing what PalmSource originally planned to do.

The motivation, we suspect, is as much about control as technology, with Palm choosing - effectively - to replicate work already done by PalmSource and later, Access, but presumably with enough of its own code in there to provide the differentiation it so desperately needs in an increasingly Windows Mobile-dominated world, on the one hand, and flash kit like the iPhone on the other.

Plenty of companies can make good smart-phone hardware - HTC, for example - limiting Palm's bid to stand out founded on its handsets' on-board software and the brand. And the two are closely connected: Palm's brand may have been built on the back of its PDA roots, but that's much less of a sell in these phone-centric times. The build the brand, then, it needs to promote software innovations, and that can only be done if it controls its own product.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
All aboard the Poo Bus! Ding ding, route Number Two departing
Only another three days of pooing and I can have a ride!
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.