Feeds

Neighbours from hell will be sent to boot camp

Sin binned

Security for virtualized datacentres

Outcast British families are to be thrown into "sin bins" till they learn how to behave in the community, according to the government.

Fifty-three Family Intervention Projects around the country will provide intensive social care for around 1,500 families a year. Some of them will be removed from their communities and housed in intensive units for round-the-clock-supervision under the government's Respect agenda.

The Communities and Local Government department did not say whether it had plans to tackle the other side of the problem for marginalised families - the communities that marginalise them.

A report on six pilots of the scheme last year found that successful interventions were ones that, in effect, provided troubled families with a surrogate community: where care workers listened, did not judge the families or deal them authoritative ultimatums, but did challenge them honestly about their social discordance, or "anti-social" behaviour, as it's called by Westminster.

In short, successful interventions earned respect, instead of demanding it. The surrogate communities could work without the families being moved from their homes into dedicated accommodation.

In today's announcement, the government justified moving families from their homes by the cost to the taxpayer. A troubled family could cost £350,000 a year in court, housing, social services, and other costs. The cost of intensive support was £8,000, or £15,000 to stick a family in separate housing.

Louise Casey, the government's coordinator for Respect, said in a statement: "Families that in the past may have been written off by agencies as 'lost causes'...now will be offered the right help and incentive to become decent members of their community and give their children the opportunity to grow up with a chance in life."

Last year's pilot report stated how NCH, the children's charity, had led the introduction of a "narrative way of working", which might help people who had been "marginalised and stigmatised by the processes of the current discourses on ASB".

In related news, Michael Meacher, MP for Oldham West and Royton, in setting out his manifesto for the leadership of the Labour party, said he would be "championing key groups now being marginalised". With prisons brimming full, the hardline approach isn't working, he said. Blair, meanwhile, was promising to get tough on gangs. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.