Feeds

Microsoft researcher obsessed with white trash data centers

Sun and Rackable pick up the phone

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

A Microsoft researcher has provided his seal of approval to the white trash data centers promoted by Sun Microsystems and Rackable Systems.

Windows Live architect and former DB2 lead architect James Hamilton has pumped out a presentation, detailing reasons why data centers in shipping containers make sense.

While thin on content, Hamilton's slideware provides the most significant embrace to date of Sun and Rackable's way out there ideas. Could Microsoft be the first major vendor to don the wife beater of mobile, compact energy consumption?

We're guessing – yes.

Hamilton's slides borrow heavily from Rackable's recent presentation of Concentro with the engineer using the server maker's photos and messages. Like Sun's Project Blackbox, Concentro packs a ton of servers, storage systems and networking into a standard shipping container. The hardware keeps cool via water and centralized fans. Overall, the well-engineered white trash data centers can consume up to 80 per cent less power than a traditional data center running on top of raised floors.

In addition, customers can ship the white trash data centers wherever they like and essentially set up a supercomputer on the fly. Sun and Rackable claim that space constrained types and those hoping to control energy costs will ship the white trash systems out to areas with clean, cheap power.

Microsoft would fit this ideal customer profile since it's in the midst of building out huge data centers to keep up with Google, Yahoo! and the like. And, as a Windows Live engineer focused on managing very large scale data center, Hamilton must be on the front lines of Microsoft's efforts.

The engineer's presentation touts all the right things, so far as Sun and Rackable would be concerned. He points out that the white trash data centers save on packaging, power and cooling costs and administration costs.

“Where do you want to compute today?”, the engineer asks at the end of the presentation, hyping the portability features of the container systems already hyped by Sun and Rackable. Lucky for the hardware vendors, Hamilton gave this presentation at an Amazon Internal Developers Conference. So, the house that Bezos built has heard the pitch too.

So far, IBM, HP and Dell have mostly scoffed at the white trash play. They might, however, want to see if Redmond recently placed a large wife beater order. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?
Don't worry about that cable, it's part of the config
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
SanDisk vows: We'll have a 16TB SSD WHOPPER by 2016
Flash WORM has a serious use for archived photos and videos
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
The total economic impact of Druva inSync
Examining the ROI enterprises may realize by implementing inSync, as they look to improve backup and recovery of endpoint data in a cost-effective manner.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.