Feeds

US businessman makes $9m selling lunar real estate

Still eight billion acres up for grabs

Intelligent flash storage arrays

An apparently unnoticed loophole in the 1967 UN Outer Space Treaty has allowed a businessman from Nevada to spawn a multi-million-dollar property business selling plots of lunar real estate at $20 (£10) an acre.

Dennis Hope has been claiming ownership of the Earth's Moon - and seven planets and their moons - for over 20 years. So far, he says he has sold more than 1.6m sq km (400 million acres) netting him $9m (£4.5m). A further eight billion acres are still up for grabs.

Unsurprisingly, no government has yet recognised the lunar sales as legally binding, dispelling speculation that maybe the moon was in fact made of money, and not cheese as previously thought.

Proposed plans to mine huge reserves of helium 3, which are in abundance on the moon and could potentially solve our planet's energy crisis, have heavily contributed to this renewed interest in our nearest celestial neighbour.

The next leg of the space race - to exploit the Moon - was further fueled by President George Bush in January 2004 when he announced the US would return to the Moon by 2017. He said he aimed to establish a long term lunar base by 2020. Curiously enough, this announcement came the day after China announced it was sending astronauts to the moon. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
GRAV WAVE DRAMA: 'Big Bang echo' may have been grit on the scanner – boffins
Exit Planet Dust on faster-than-light expansion of universe
SpaceX Dragon cargo truck flies 3D printer to ISS: Clawdown in 3, 2...
Craft berths at space station with supplies, experiments, toys
That glass of water you just drank? It was OLDER than the SUN
One MEELLION years older. Some of it anyway
Big dinosaur wowed females with its ENORMOUS HOOTER
That's right, Doris, I've got biggest snout in the prehistoric world
Japanese volcano eruption reportedly leaves 31 people presumed dead
Hopes fade of finding survivors on Mount Ontake
Relive the death of Earth over and over again in Extinction Game
Apocalypse now, and tomorrow, and the next day, and the day after that ...
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.