Feeds

UK.biz still reluctant to report cybercrime

No publicity please

High performance access to file storage

A third of UK businesses fail to report information security crimes and breaches, according to a new survey.

The poll of 285 firms, which was followed up by in depth interviews with 20 Chief Security Officers (CSOs) of large enterprises, revealed that IT managers are faced with a dilemma about whether or not to report crime. Businesses are subject to hacking attacks almost daily, ranging from simple port scans and Trojan attacks to more serious assaults.

Managers need to weigh the balance between an organisation’s responsibility to report crime in order to prevent and predict incidents and the possible effects on their reputation from becoming known as a target of hacker attacks.

Protecting a firm's reputation is often the primary concern. "From my experience as a media lawyer, reporting crime to the police is a double edged sword as invariably the press have found out about the incident within 24 hours of reporting it to the police, creating a real PR risk." Says media lawyer Jonathan Coad from Swan Turton.

Phillip Virgo, Secretary General of think tank Eurim, said that firms need a clearer idea of where to turn to for assistance. "The time has come to respond to the needs of the customer for security tools they can understand, realistic advice, guidance and support on how to use them and for reporting systems that will route their enquiry to some-one who will respond - be it law enforcement or technical support," he said.

The survey was carried out by the organisers of the Infosecurity Europe 2007 conference, which takes places in London's Olympia between 24 and 26 April. Cyber-crime will be the topic of several keynotes and seminars at the show including the keynote on, Should You Always Report Crime?. The conference session will be chaired by Geoff Smith, head of information security policy at the DTI. Representatives from law enforcement and industry will also debate e-crime reporting structures and related matters during a panel discussion that forms parts of the keynote, due to take place at 1500 on Wednesday, 25 April. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Bad PUPPY: Undead Windows XP deposits fresh scamware on lawn
Installing random interwebs shiz will bork your zombie box
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.