Feeds

Advertising Standards slap down BT complaint

Sky's 'free' offer gets thumbs-up

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has rejected a complaint made by BT against BSkyB's "free" broadband campaign last year.

BT complained to watchdogs that Sky falsely advertised its broadband offering as "free", since customers had to pay a £40 connection fee. Sky rolled out the service in summer last year, soon after TalkTalk had caused a rumpus with the first "free" broadband offer. In that case the ASA ruled against the advertiser.

The ASA disagreed with BT's misgivings, and accepted Sky's explanation that its direct marketing campaign was not misleading, since the connection charge was spelled out on the back of the mailing in small print.

The ASA said it in this case it had reminded Sky that it was only allowed to call its broadband "free" for a while, since customers would soon view it as an inclusive service rather than a bonus. Since it launched its "See, Speak, Surf" package in January, Sky has instead marketed broadband as part of a triple play bundle.

The regulators have come in for consumer criticism lately for alleged soft treatment of broadband providers. A petition is calling on the government or Ofcom to act against "unlimited" download claims and other tricksy marketing practices.

In response to Wednesday's adjudication, a BT spokesman told The Register: "We would welcome clearer advertising from Sky."

BT now finds itself in a similar position to Virgin Media, competing with Sky on several fronts. The national telco recently launched its own pay TV platform, BT Vision, while Sky now offers own-brand broadband and home phone services.

There hasn't always been needle between BT and Sky. In 2002 they signed an accord which saw Sky punt broadband to its TV subscribers, and BT market satellite TV. The mutual back-scratching was a response to resurgent competition from cable operators. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...
Guess they don't like our battery-draining update?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.