Feeds

Sun to fry NetApp with FISH

Smells like NAS, dude

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Sun Microsystems has a near-term NetApp assault in store code-named 'FISHworks.'

The FISH stands for “Fully Integrated Software and Hardware” and comes from work done by some of Sun's top software engineers over the past year.

The first run of the technology will see Sun bundle Solaris, the ZFS file system, DTrace and a number of other software packages together on a NAS (network attached storage)-like hardware system. Sun hopes to kick NetApp where it hurts, banking on the theory that no one wants a complex, proprietary storage OS in this day and age.

But there's far more to the FISHworks agenda than a NAS appliance.

As discussed here, Sun's software engineers have been hammering away at next-generation system designs for more than a year – at the special request of CTO and R&D chief Greg Papadopoulos. Sun hopes to create a wide range of FISHworks type systems to address the storage, networking and server markets.

What exactly is that magical smell behind the FISHworks gear?

Well, we'd love to tell you but can't. Sun only briefed analysts on the FISHworks plan during a February meeting, keeping hacks like yours truly away from the meat. Thankfully, we routed around Sun's barriers to turn up a few choice details.

One such item is that Sun has yet to commit to releasing the FISHworks gear. From what we hear, however, this is just a line the company has tossed to finicky analysts. Our sources indicate that Sun will run with the FISH in short order.

The FISH gear also has all the bells and whistles you might expect of an appliance like system such as a nice GUI and the ability to craft a web server, security system or VoIP box with a few clicks. More importantly, Sun looks to separate itself from other vendors via tools such as DTrace that will allow customers to tweak the performance of their appliances on-the-fly.

Beyond that, we have painfully little else to offer.

If Sun's top brains have spent the last year dumping their favorite bits of code onto a NAS box and then patting themselves on the back for the effort, the company will fail to impress with the fresh FISH. We're guessing some secret sauce – call it project Tartar [You're pathetic - Ed] – must be lurking in a NDA . . . somewhere . . . right?

In any case, Sun's storage business can always use some help and going after NetApp seems like a low hanging fruit approach indeed. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
SDI wars: WTF is software defined infrastructure?
This time we play for ALL the marbles
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Symantec backs out of Backup Exec: Plans to can appliance in Jan
Will still provide support to existing customers
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.