Feeds
80%

Griffin Elevator laptop lift

Put your notebook screen on the right level

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The upper part of the two metal bars point forward and slightly down, at an angle of about 10° - unadjustable, alas. I found that too shallow an angle to use the laptop's keyboard to work on, particularly since the stand raises the machine by 10-15cm, front to back. It's uncomfortable lifting your hands that high.

Not that Griffin expects you to type on the lifted laptop - it envisages you connecting a separate keyboard and mouse, and using those. So, in use, you still need desk space for the stand and input devices, so you don't really gain much room, though you can tuck the keyboard under the computer when you've done for the day.

What the Elevator does that is useful is place the laptop's screen at a better height. The top of my raised MacBook Pro's display is now at eye level - exactly where it should be if you take the ergonomics advice computer and monitor vendors tuck away at the back of their user manuals.

Griffin Technology Elevator notebook stand

The upshot is that your neck should remain straight while you work, and not bent forward as it is when you peer down at a laptop sat on the desk. Me, I've grown accustomed to that, so having the screen so high up - or so it seemed - felt slightly odd at first. But I quickly got used to it. Whether that's enough of an incentive to buy the Elevator if you're comfortable already, I can't say, but if you're finding laptop usage is straining your neck, you'll probably find the Elevator cheap at twice the price.

One final point: Griffin claims the Elevator makes for a cooler machine because it allows air to circulate around the machine more freely, but I'm not convinced - my MacBook Pro feels as warm as usual. But at least my hands aren't touching it now.

Verdict

Griffin's Elevator is a treat for necks cricked by laptop owners being forced to peer down at their displays. It's a little pricey - you can get the same effect for free with a pile of books, for instance - but it's certainly less imposing, more stylish and easier to move about than such DIY notebook stands.

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

80%

Griffin Elevator laptop lift

Elevator lifts your laptop to new heights. But it's pricey compared to a stack of books
Price: $40/£30 RRP

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.