Feeds
80%

Sapphire Radeon X1950 GT-based graphics card

Cheaper than the X1950 Pro - but potentially as powerful?

SANS - Survey on application security programs

We used an oddball test platform comprising an Intel D975XBX motherboard with a Pentium D processor running at 3.46GHz. It has two cores with Hyper-threading to give four virtual cores but it’s a toasty beast that draws over 100W. In addition, we used 2GB of PC2-6400 Kingston Hyper X memory and a WD150 Raptor hard drive. We ran Windows XP Pro SP2 with Catalyst 7.2 drivers.

Let’s take a quick look at the Sapphire package. Naturally, the GT has dual DVI outputs as well as s-video so you get two DVI-to-VGA adaptors, an s-video extension cable, an s-video-to-composite adaptor, a composite cable and an s-video-to-component adaptor cable. The GT requires a single six-pin PCI Express power connector and Sapphire includes an adaptor so you can employ a regular four-pin Molex connector, just in case your power supply doesn’t have a suitable connector.

Sapphire Radeon X1950 GT

In addition to the driver CD you get PowerDVD 6 and Just Cause which looks as though it might be based on Revolution.

Testing started badly.

The single-slot Sapphire GT roared into life and once the Catalyst drivers had installed the fan continued to roar. We used Riva Tuner to check what was going on and found that the fan was spinning at 81 per cent of maximum speed. We manually adjusted the speed to 50 per cent and found that the GT didn’t go over 50°C even when it was working hard. Dropping the fan speed further, to 40 per cent, raised the temperature by five degrees.

Sapphire Radeon X1950 GT - the box

We put in a call to Sapphire and were told that our samples must have a development BIOS so a quick email later and we had an updated BIOS which took seconds to install and all was well. Suddenly, the graphics card was quieter than the processor cooler, which is how we like things to be.

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Next page: Verdict

More from The Register

next story
WTF happened to Pac-Man?
In his thirties and still afraid of ghosts
Reg man builds smart home rig, gains SUPREME CONTROL of DOMAIN – Pics
LightwaveRF and Arduino: Bright ideas for dim DIYers
Leaked pics show EMBIGGENED iPhone 6 screen
Fat-fingered fanbois rejoice over Chinternet snaps
Happy 25th birthday, Game Boy!
Monochrome handset ushered in modern mobile gaming era
Rounded corners? Pah! Amazon's '3D phone has eye-tracking tech'
Now THAT'S what we call a proper new feature
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Slip your finger in this ring and unlock your backdoor, phone, etc
Take a look at this new NFC jewellery – why, what were you thinking of?
US mobile firms cave on kill switch, agree to install anti-theft code
Slow and kludgy rollout will protect corporate profits
Leaked photos may indicate slimmer next-generation iPad
Will iPad Air evolve into iPad Helium?
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.