Feeds

US loses top tech spot

As Denmark climbs to number one

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

The US has slipped down the rankings of technology nations, falling from the top spot to number seven in the latest rankings from the World Economic Forum.

In 2005-2006, the US was number one followed by Singapore, Denmark, and Iceland. But this year's Global Information Technology Report puts the US in seventh place. The UK manages to crawl up one place - from tenth last year to ninth this year.

The report looks at 122 countries and judges their infrastructure according to 67 variables. It judges network readiness in three ways: a conducive environment in terms of regulation and hard and soft infrastructure; the level of readiness among individuals, businesses and government; and the actual use of information and communication technology by those three groups.

Denmark won the top spot this year, and all Nordic countries except Iceland moved up the list. China makes it into the top 20 for the first time - at joint thirteenth along with Taiwan.*

Irene Mia, a co-author of the report and senior economist at the World Economic Forum, told the Reg: "It's not really such a big fall for the US - when you're in the top 10 little differences in scores can mean a big fall in position. But the regulatory environment was seen as less favourable and usage fell - not in actual terms but against other countries which have gained more. The US is still number one in many ways - for venture capital, for innovation - in terms of patents."

Mia said ICT was also starting to make a real impact on the developing world and sub-Saharan Africa. Mia said: "It's extremely important, not just for productivity and competitiveness, but also for everyday life. The impact of mobile phones for access to markets and education or even just keeping in touch with people. Latin America is also making progress, slower than parts of Asia but it is making progress."

Go here for more details - there's even a stuttery Google video to watch.

*Bootnote: An observant reader pointed out: Mainland China is at 59th place. It's Taiwan, China at 13th place.®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 claimed lives of HIV/AIDS cure scientists
Researchers, advocates, health workers among those on shot-down plane
Mwa-ha-ha-ha! Eccentric billionaire Musk gets his PRIVATE SPACEPORT
In the Lone Star State, perhaps appropriately enough
All those new '5G standards'? Here's the science they rely on
Radio professor tells us how wireless will get faster in the real world
The Sun took a day off last week and made NO sunspots
Someone needs to get that lazy star cooking again before things get cold around here
Diary note: Pluto's close-up is a year from … now!
New Horizons is less than a year from the dwarf planet
Boffins discuss AI space program at hush-hush IARPA confab
IBM, MIT, plenty of others invited to fill Uncle Sam's spy toolchest, but where's Google?
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.