Feeds

Bulgarian 'stole $350k' from Americans in eBay scam

Whistling down the wire fraud

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

A Bulgarian woman has been arrested and charged with participating in a scheme that used eBay to scam Americans out of at least $350,000. Her alleged fraud is similar to dozens of scams found on the auction site daily.

Mariyana Feliksova Lozanova, a.k.a. "Gentiane La France," a.k.a. "Naomi Elizabeth DeBont," was indicted for conspiracy to commit wire fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering, according to a US Department of Justice press release. She was apprehended by law enforcement officials from Budapest, Hungary.

Lozanova, an alleged member of a transnational crime group, stands accused of participating in a scheme to advertise expensive cars, boats and other items for sale on eBay. Prospective buyers were directed to wire payments through "eBay Secure Traders," a sham service designed to persuade victims the sales were legit. In fact, the funds were transferred into bank accounts controlled by Lozanova and her co-conspirators.

Victims who wired money never received the merchandise and never got a refund. Lozanova withdrew the funds shortly after they were wired into her account, which she opened using fake Canadian and UK passports, officials said.

The arrest is sure to be welcome news to critics who claim eBay officials don't do enough to police their site against fraud. But it's also easy to see the arrest as little more than raking leaves on a windy day. Scams like the one Lozanova is accused of furthering are carried out on almost a 24/7 basis. A single search late on Monday afternoon California time, for example, uncovered eight auctions on eBay Motors advertising vintage cars and instructing interested buyers to contact the seller's gmail account. (To be fair, those auctions were removed within 30 minutes.)

Lozanova faces up to 30 years in prison and could be required to pay $500,000 in fines, in addition to forfeitures and restitution to the victims. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Black Hat anti-Tor talk smashed by lawyers' wrecking ball
Unmasking hidden users is too hot for Carnegie-Mellon
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.