Feeds

NEC and Stratus find fault tolerance with each other

Four-core Xeon box gets hard

The essential guide to IT transformation

NEC and Stratus have made good on their intellectual property marriage, pumping out a new, beefier fault-tolerant server.

Starting in June, customers can purchase the NEC Express5800/320Fc and the Stratus ftServer 6200 systems. The two-socket servers will run on Intel's four-core version of Xeon code-named 'Clovertown' and work as higher-end complements to existing kit centered on Intel's dual-core 'Paxville' chip. Customers will pick up such systems for the typical fault-tolerant tasks such as running banks or emergency response centers.

NEC is very proud of the engineering goodies added to the latest gear.

On a basic level, you'll find a zippy 1333MHz front side bus, support for 24GB of memory, PCI-X and PCI Express slots, support for both SATA and SAS drives and support for 667MHz DDR2 memory. All of those features stand as improvements over the 320Ma currently sold by NEC with the company improving speed across the board (200 per cent better overall performance) and adding more component options.

Digging deeper, NEC has rigged the 320Fc with its FT Crossbar, which links the processors to the I/O subsystems. The crossbar makes sure that no single point of failure exists inside the server, allowing NEC to boast about its fault tolerance. (The server can crunch through the same data in both memory banks at the same time and execute across both sockets at the same time.)

In short, the NEC system has two servers working on mirrored copies of a single operating system and applications. If one system breaks down, there's no problem as its complement will pick up the work.

Much of this “Lockstep” technology comes from Stratus, which formed even closer ties to NEC back in 2005. The two companies agreed to co-develop systems with NEC placing more emphasis on hardware design and Stratus banging away on code.

The 4U NEC system will run between $47,000 and $60,000 with support for Windows Server Enterprise Edition (R2) 2003 in June and RHEL 4.0 Advanced Server support coming at the end of the fourth quarter. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything
Enter credit card details if you want that system you bought to actually be useful
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers
Think those are cool? Wait till you get a load of our racks
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
VMware's high-wire balancing act: EVO might drag us ALL down
Get it right, EMC, or there'll be STORAGE CIVIL WAR. Mark my words
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.