Feeds

New criminal investigation into Ohio elections

Those voting machines, what a hoot

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

A criminal investigation is to be launched into the way the November 2006 elections were run in Cleveland, Ohio, according to reports.

The new probe has been sparked by a report compiled by election board public monitor CSU's Candice Hoke. County Prosecutor Bill Mason read the report and said there were several "worrying" things within.

In Cuyahoga County officials were given special dispensation to scan early postal votes. They were specifically prohibited from counting the votes, however, until the polls had closed.

But, according to Mason, Hoke's report suggests that a clock on the computer controlling the election seemed to be changed several times in the two days prior to the election in November.

"There is a possibility that there were some totals that were run during that 48-hour period, that's a concern," Mason told a local Fox news station. He says there is no evidence that anyone tampered with the result, but that it looks as though someone had access to the system.

Other security blunders include allowing people with access to the election computer to share the same password. Keys to the tabulation room were kept in an unlocked box, and a cable to the computer controlling the election was apparently left plugged in all night on the evening of the election.

Now Bill Mason has appointed special prosecutor Kevin Baxter to investigate. Baxter was the man behind the investigations that led to last week's conviction of two election workers for rigging the recount in the 2004 presidential elections. There is no suggestion they were trying to alter the outcome: merely that they wanted to avoid a more thorough review of the count.

Bob Bennett, head of the elections board, says Mason is criminalising honest mistakes, but Mason says all he wants is for people to do their jobs. If they did, he argues, "then there'd be nothing to worry about".

Newly elected Secretary of State Jennifer Brunner says she is prepared to fire all four board officials for the 2004 fiasco if they don't resign. Two have already fallen on their swords, but the remaining pair look ready to fight it out. A removal hearing is expected to begin on 2 April. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
4chan outraged by Emma Watson nudie photo leak SCAM
In the immortal words of Shaggy, it wasn't me us ... amirite?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.