Feeds

Philips to glitz up gadgets with Swarovski sparklies

You bet your glass

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

So what do women really want from technology? That it should be easy to use? That it should work straight out of the box? That it should be, dare I say it, useful? Not at all, says Philips, we want it to sparkle.

Yes, it's partnering with glass-blower Swarovski to bring a little luxury - and I stress the word 'little' - to a new line of audio accessories and storage products due to go on sale this summer under the Active Crystal brand.

Philips - the only company I know of with a tagline that sounds like a Jane Austen pastiche: "Sense and Simplicity", since you ask - said the new products will "go back to the essence of what many women are looking for".

What, more considerate partners? No more glass ceilings? Pay parity? An evening with the one on ER with the eyebrows? Nope, they're looking for "the fusion of functionality and fashion through a unique combination of technology and elegance".

Swarovski's input will be to provide the Dutch hardware giant with "truly jewels with a soul". Which sounds like something out of a JRR Tolkien pastiche: probably something with "Shanara" in the title, since you ask...

Swarovski has what we call 'form' here: last year Germany's Medion launched a limited-edition laptop with its name and a flower dot-matrixed onto the lid out of dozens of Swarovski's soulful crystals.

I hope Philips' sparkly toys look better. You'll be able to find out in June, when Parisian "concept store" Colette will be mounting a sneak preview of the crystal-encrusted offerings, all of which are due to go on sale in August.

the hardware widow
The Hardware Widow is hitched to a geek who thinks he knows more about technology than she does...

The Hardware Widow on...

Russia's Tsar-studded Nokia 8800
Motorola's Korean StarTAC revamp
Samsung's Ultra Edition Part Deux
Asus' lacquer'n'leather luxury laptop
Sony's blue Vaio
The Vertu Constellation luxury phone
LG's Prada phone

The Hardware Widow reviews...

Asus' leather-clad laptop

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Report: Apple seeking to raise iPhone 6 price by a HUNDRED BUCKS
'Well, that 5c experiment didn't go so well – let's try the other direction'
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Nvidia gamers hit trifecta with driver, optimizer, and mobile upgrades
Li'l Shield moves up to Android 4.4.2 KitKat, GameStream comes to notebooks
Gimme a high S5: Samsung Galaxy S5 puts substance over style
Biometrics and kid-friendly mode in back-to-basics blockbuster
AMD unveils Godzilla's graphics card – 'the world's fastest, period'
The Radeon R9 295X2: Water-cooled, 5,632 stream processors, 11.5TFLOPS
Sony battery recall as VAIO goes out with a bang, not a whimper
The perils of having Panasonic as a partner
NORKS' own smartmobe pegged as Chinese landfill Android
Fake kit in the hermit kingdom? That's just Kim Jong-un-believable!
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.