Feeds

Say hi to the internet-controlled car

Knight Rider-style tech redefines war driving

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

Technology has been developed which allows motorists to control and track their cars on the internet.

Knight Rider-style systems from Inilex permit drivers to unlock their car doors, start their vehicle, disable the engine or display a car's location.

Those who've lost their vehicle in a multi-story car park or who find it stolen from a location without ready net access need fear not. Subscribers can call up the system by ringing a toll-free number as well as logging on over the net using a PC or PDA, Autoblog reports.

The system offers a degree of improved convenience and protection for those who like to internet-enable everything in their lives. The ability to track where their kids are after borrowing their parents' car, through text message or email alerts, is another benefit of the system, according to Inilex. The firm lists this feature as one of the main benefits of the technology even though it's mainly targeting the commercial fleet vehicle market.

A web-based demo (here) gives an overview of the core features on Inilex's Kepler Advantage technology, an expensive bit of kit that costs between $600 and $1,000. It's unclear which car models are supported via the technology, although the presence of a built-in computer system to control the car and a data access point are natural prerequisites. The technology was demonstrated at a US trade show in January and has since enjoyed modest sales.

The system is by no means unique, as car enthusiast site Straightline reports. LoJack offers stolen vehicle tracking technology, while OnStar sells car GPS location capabilities with remote control features.

We remain unconvinced that Inilex's system offers much more than technology in search of a problem, unless you're a hacker. As security guru Bruce Schneier notes the potential to control someone else's car over the internet gives a new meaning to the phrase "war driving", which is normally associated with driving around in the search for insecure wireless networks. ®

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
Apple fanbois SCREAM as update BRICKS their Macbook Airs
Ragegasm spills over as firmware upgrade kills machines
Attack of the clones: Oracle's latest Red Hat Linux lookalike arrives
Oracle's Linux boss says Larry's Linux isn't just for Oracle apps anymore
THUD! WD plonks down SIX TERABYTE 'consumer NAS' fatboy
Now that's a LOT of porn or pirated movies. Or, you know, other consumer stuff
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
FLAPE – the next BIG THING in storage
Find cold data with flash, transmit it from tape
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.