Feeds

Say hi to the internet-controlled car

Knight Rider-style tech redefines war driving

Security for virtualized datacentres

Technology has been developed which allows motorists to control and track their cars on the internet.

Knight Rider-style systems from Inilex permit drivers to unlock their car doors, start their vehicle, disable the engine or display a car's location.

Those who've lost their vehicle in a multi-story car park or who find it stolen from a location without ready net access need fear not. Subscribers can call up the system by ringing a toll-free number as well as logging on over the net using a PC or PDA, Autoblog reports.

The system offers a degree of improved convenience and protection for those who like to internet-enable everything in their lives. The ability to track where their kids are after borrowing their parents' car, through text message or email alerts, is another benefit of the system, according to Inilex. The firm lists this feature as one of the main benefits of the technology even though it's mainly targeting the commercial fleet vehicle market.

A web-based demo (here) gives an overview of the core features on Inilex's Kepler Advantage technology, an expensive bit of kit that costs between $600 and $1,000. It's unclear which car models are supported via the technology, although the presence of a built-in computer system to control the car and a data access point are natural prerequisites. The technology was demonstrated at a US trade show in January and has since enjoyed modest sales.

The system is by no means unique, as car enthusiast site Straightline reports. LoJack offers stolen vehicle tracking technology, while OnStar sells car GPS location capabilities with remote control features.

We remain unconvinced that Inilex's system offers much more than technology in search of a problem, unless you're a hacker. As security guru Bruce Schneier notes the potential to control someone else's car over the internet gives a new meaning to the phrase "war driving", which is normally associated with driving around in the search for insecure wireless networks. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Symantec backs out of Backup Exec: Plans to can appliance in Jan
Will still provide support to existing customers
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.