Feeds

AXA grabs ink with business crime league table

Crime against individuals over-hyped, says exec

Security for virtualized datacentres

Insurance company Axa yesterday released an intriguing survey of business claims by region, which has been widely reported.

According to the survey, the UK's arson capital is Glasgow, accounting for nearly 11 per cent of all small and medium enterprise (SME) arson claims, while Edinburgh reportedly leads the nation in malicious damage.

However, the Scottish cities placed a disappointing eighth and sixteenth in the overall business crimes league, behind Leicester, Cardiff, Nottingham, Birmingham, Derby, Liverpool, and Manchester.

According to Axa, crimes against businesses are an under-reported problem. Axa's head of property, Neil Mercier, was quoted as saying: "We are concerned that while crime against individuals continues to generate significant column inches, public awareness of business crime remains low."

Axa is a leading SME insurer, and would no doubt like to see more effort devoted to protecting its clients' property.

According to the Treasury (pdf), government revenues from individuals via income tax and NI contributions heavily outweigh those from corporation tax. Similarly, council taxes provide more revenue than business rates. It would appear that it's mainly individuals who pay for public security efforts, so perhaps it's right that public concern and thus public bodies focus mainly on protecting them rather than businesses. In this context, Axa's use of regional sentiment to gain column inches and public interest appears rather cunning.

When this was put to Axa today, a company spokesperson firmly denied that any corporate agenda lay behind the press release. AXA has no desire to see any reallocation of public resources to fighting business crime, and sees its role merely as "a good friend to small businesses". The league table of crime was "an indication of crime hotspots, so that businesses would know the risks." ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Bono apologises for iTunes album dump
Megalomania, generosity and FEAR of irrelevance drove group to Apple deal
HBO shocks US pay TV world: We're down with OTT. Netflix says, 'Gee'
This affects every broadcaster, every cable guy
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
French 'terror law' declares WAR on the INTERNET itself, say digi-rights folks
Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité: Two out of three ain't bad
SCREW YOU, EU: BBC rolls out Right To Remember as Google deletes links
Not even Google can withstand the power of Auntie
Arab States make play for greater government control of the internet
Nerds told to get lost in last-minute power grab bid at UN meeting
Zippy one-liners, broken promises: Doctor Who on the Orient Express
Series finally hits stride, but Clara's U-turn is baffling
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.