Feeds

ECS to fly Flybook wannabe into CeBIT

Firm's G200 looks strangely familiar...

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Taiwanese hardware maker Elitegroup ECS yesterday revealed it's going to be demo'ing at Germany's CeBIT show this week. One offering caught our eye: the G200 laptop, which sports an "ingenious... smart neck that allows the screen to be lifted, tilted or swiveled to a comfortable level for the user".

Indeed, it is ingenious, but the ECS didn't come up with the idea. Enter Taiwanese notebook developer Dialogue. In June 2006, it showed off its Flybook VM. As the pics we took of the device at the Computex event in Taipei show, the VM's screen is mounted on a telescopic stand allowing the display to be position upward and forwards more like a desktop LCD monitor.

dialogue flybook vm

dialogue flybook vm

Compare that with this shot of ECS' G200, now doing the rounds on the web:

Elitegroup ECS G200 notebook

This isn't the first time Dialogue's design has cropped up elsewhere. At its Developer Forum event in September 2006, Intel showed off a concept laptop with - you've guessed it - a special 'slide up and tilt forward' display. Here it is:

intel's perlmutter and prototype

Security for virtualized datacentres

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.