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Intel prices up updated Core 2 Duos, Quads

Steering into the mainstream

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Just how much is Intel planning to charge for its revamped Core 2 Duo desktop processors, due Q3? Not as much as you might expect, it would seem, if the latest information coming from motherboard-maker moles is to be believed.

We've reported before that Core 2 Duos supporting a frontside bus clock of 1333MHz are due to ship later this year. Models on the roadmap include the 3GHz Core 2 Duo E6850 and the 2.66GHz E6750. The previously listed E6650 appears to have been dropped in favour of the E6550, a 2.33GHz part that runs over the current peak FSB speed, 1066GHz.

New to the roadmap - as listed by Chinese-language site HKEPC - is the E6450, which is essentially the E6550 but lacking support for Intel's Trusted Exectution Technology, formerly known as 'La Grande' and a key component of the chip maker's vPro business computing platform.

The E6540's price isn't yet known, but the E6550 is said to be set to be priced at $163. The E6750 will apparently come in at $183 and the E6850 at $266. That compares to the current top-of-the-line Core 2 Duo E6700, priced now at $530, though it's expected to fall to $316 on 22 April.

Intel's current four-core desktop chip, the 2.4GHz Core 2 Quad Q6600 will have its price cut to $266 in Q3, after falling from $851 to $530 on 22 April, it's said. The 2.66GHz Q6700 - due to debut in Q3, according to past roadmap leaks - will initially ship for $530. These price points, and those of the dual-core E6x50s, are clearly intended to drive the multi-core parts into the mainstream during the latter half of the year.

Q3 is also expected to see the arrival of the 2.2GHz Core 2 Duo E4500 - another new roadmap edition - at $133. Q2's 2GHz E4400, which will also debut at $133, will see its price cut to $113 when the faster chip arrives.

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