Feeds

Internet producers bank on Apple TV

After phones, Steve Jobs saves television

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

SXSW This will be the year the history books will record as the beginning of the end for the way we watch television.

That was the prediction of Jay Adelson, CEO of Digg and internet tech TV outfit Revision3. Preaching to the choir at SXSW, Adelson said internet TV would render niche cable programming moribund once advertisers get their heads around the medium, and there are more appealing ways to get internet video to the living room.

At a panel event in Austin, producers of niche internet TV said they are pinning hopes on the next charge of set top boxes, led by Apple TV. Advertising cash follows eyeballs, and Steve Jobs' other 2007 launch will be their turnkey to release programming from its current techie audience, members of the SXSW crowd told The Register.

Advertisers are learning the value of small, passionate audiences, even if they are criticised by them. Adelson joked: "My biggest advertiser is Go Daddy, which will touch anything." The domain name registrar has attracted criticism - and millions of dollars in free marketing - for its titillating advertising campaign, which has aired during the Superbowl.

The potential iceberg of copyright control still loiters on the horizon. The halfway house approach recently adopted by Viacom, where it insists it hosts all its own content, freezing out YouTubers but offering a proprietary embeddable player, doesn't impress AOL's director of creative development Nicole Carrico, who said: "If your content becomes successful, it's going to exceed your grasp. They're going to have to relax their death grip."

Some of the distribution end of the traditional TV market is coming to understand that they may not need the protectionist mentality anymore, Adelson claimed. He said: "Traditional distributors are coming to us with non-exclusive deals. This is new stuff."

The message we took away from the discussion was that internet TV has time to take on board the hard lessons still being learned by the music business as it struggles to rid itself of DRM. Despite acknowledgement at the highest levels of record companies that DRM does nothing to protect their revenues, EMI recently canned widely-trailed talks to ditch it. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Premier League wants to PURGE ALL FOOTIE GIFs from social media
Not paying Murdoch? You're gonna get a right LEGALLING - thanks to automated software
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Ballmer quits Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Online tat bazaar eBay coughs to YET ANOTHER outage
Web-based flea market struck dumb by size and scale of fail
Amazon takes swipe at PayPal, Square with card reader for mobes
Etailer plans to undercut rivals with low transaction fee offer
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.