Feeds

Former Wipro salesman sues for £1m in commission

Says it didn't shell out for outsourcing deal

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

A salesman who helped Wipro, India's largest outsourcing firm, win the "mother of all outsourcing deals" to supply IT services to Shell is suing the firm for unpaid commission on the deal.

Paul van den Berg, a business development manager at Wipro Limited in the UK between July 2003 and February 2005, is suing Wipro Ltd, the firm's UK arm, for breach of contract to get what he says is unpaid commission of at least £1m on a deal estimated to be worth in excess of $200m.

His solicitor, Hanna Weber of Zimmers Law, said his commission could be worth upwards of £3m since the value of the contract might now be worth as much as $500m.

His claim against Wipro Ltd, filed with the High Court in London, stated that the exact amount of commission owed couldn't be known until full details of the deal were released.

The claim states that Wipro had lured van den Berg from his job at rival outsourcer Infosys, where he had been doing business with Royal Dutch Shell Plc since 1984.

Wipro offered "significantly more lucrative payment terms in particular in relation to commission" because it valued van den Berg's relationship with Shell, it said.

Van den Berg's claim is also made against Mr Kees ten Nijenhuis, who as a vice president of Wipro Europe had offered the salesman a 1.25 per cent commission, it said. The terms were agreed in part verbally with Nijenhuis and top Wipro executive Sudip Nandy, but did not all find their way onto paper.

van den Berg persistently complained that his commission had failed to materialise. The claim said he complained to Wipro chairman Azim Premji about it.

Wipro's defence, filed at the High Court on its behalf by Timothy Pitt-Payne of PWC Legal, denies that it lured van den Berg from Infosys with the offer of a lucrative commission.

It said van den Berg approached Nijenhuis for a job with the suggestion that he could help Wipro win the Shell account. It said that during interviews, Nijenhuis had explained that Wipro's salespeople got incentive payments on top of their salaries, but that human resources would settle the details.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
In the next four weeks, 100 people will decide the future of the web
While America tucks into Thanksgiving turkey, the world will be taking over the net
Microsoft EU warns: If you have ties to the US, Feds can get your data
European corps can't afford to get complacent while American Big Biz battles Uncle Sam
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.