Feeds

NetApp pumps its midrange

SAN/NAS hybrid is a rose, not a monster

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

Network Appliance has renewed another chunk of its midrange, sliding the 3040 series in on top of the 3020 and 3050. The new box adds technology such as 64-bit processors, 4Gig Fibre Channel and Gig Ethernet, and is in effect a half-size version of the 3070 released last year.

The new box is available in two forms – the FAS3040 includes up to 126TB of 500GB hard disks, while the V3040 is just the virtualising controller and is aimed at users who have disk arrays already, or want to buy them from sources other than NetApp. Dual-active controller pairs are possible for resilience, too.

NetApp product marketeer John Rollason compared the FAS3040 to both SAN subsystems and NAS gateways from EMC and HP, claiming that NetApp's unified storage approach means it can do with one box what the others need two or three for.

"All our platforms support NFS and CIFS, plus iSCSI and Fibre Channel," he said. "Most analysts separate the market into SAN and NAS, but we don't. We don't believe you should have to make a choice."

He acknowledged that this can mean apparent inefficiencies – for example, emulating iSCSI block storage as a file which is in turn hosted on virtualised disk blocks – but claimed that it still outperformed its rivals in tests.

"We have an operating system and a file system at the core of the device," he said. "In the real world it's how the performance stacks up and we have benchmarks on that." For example, he cited Spec_sfs tests which showed the FAS3040 outperforming an EMC Celerra NS80G by as much as 38 per cent.

The FAS3040 and V3040 run the same Data ONTAP 7G software as NetApp's other filers. Rollason said this means the V3040 has features that rival virtualising storage controllers from EMC, IBM and HDS lack, such as NAS, low-overhead cloning, and thin provisioning.

The FAS3040 will cost around £45,000 for a device with one controller, 2TB of disk and the iSCSI software. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.