Feeds

Microsoft proto-being stirs into Live

Primeval sludge is wriggling

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Microsoft's Live isn't, well, live - at least not in a "here it is with a full set of bells and whistles" sense. But it is here, as a proto-being, and the company wants developers to go and try it out, find out what it can do and, from there, get some ideas on what they might want to do with it.

According to Ian Moulster, Live's UK product manager in Microsoft's product development evangelism group, the service is still very much an evolutionary process. "There are gaps in what is on offer and the vision for it is not complete," he said.

In practice, this is hardly surprising, as much of the final vision will come from what end users ultimately find useful about its capabilities, and developers get their teeth into what's possible with it. That also is why there seems a bit of a dichotomy between the demos used to show its capabilities and the marketing line being used to promote it.

For example, the market reference points used are services such as Hotmail (with a claimed 240 million active users) and Messenger (with 230 million). These numbers are then coupled to the concept of "Me", the individual at the centre of everything with family and friends as the immediate circle around "me" and then associates, groups with common interests, etc. That seems squarely aimed at the likes of Google and Yahoo!, which have tended to gain the mindshare advantage with the young and hedonistic.

The Live demos seen so far, however, have tended to have a strong business orientation, being largely based around the real service possibilities that exist around mashups using Microsoft's Virtual Earth mapping and imagery service and a variety of directory, messaging and database services using Visual Web Developer.

One example being used by Microsoft shows how Lewisham Council is identifying anti-social issues such as graffiti by using its website to show before and after images, details of work to be conducted, and a map to show the location. There were other demos built on the "user need-search directories-locate on map-route find" model, which could certainly have commercial potential.

This isn't a snipe at Live, however, for with a range of functions and services already available for developers to play with, any demo will, by its nature, be truncated. And it is the type of blank canvas service offering where one developer's meat will be another developer's bowl of muesli.

The only real answer is, on this occasion, exactly what Microsoft wants it to be – for developers to go and have a play with Live to see what they can build with it. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Google opens Inbox – email for people too stupid to use email
Print this article out and give it to someone techy if you get stuck
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.