Feeds

Home secretary announces gun crime crackdown

Database to link weapons to crimes

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The government is to improve technology for linking weapons to incidents as part of a three point plan to tackle gun crime.

Other measures include tough punishments for those who use other people to look after weapons and increased funding for community groups.

The home secretary announced the three point plan following a gun crime summit, chaired by the prime minister, and including senior police officers, representatives from community groups, and voluntary organisations.

From April 2008 the Home Office plans to launch the National Ballistics Intelligence Database (NABID), which will replace the current £1.1m National Firearms Forensic Intelligence Database (NFFID), launched in 2002.

A Home Office spokesperson told GC News: "The new system is an improved version of NFFID.

"It will be placed in all 43 police forces in England and Wales. We are currently in talks with Scotland and Northern Ireland to allow them access to it."

The spokesperson said NFFID is being shelved because it is "too expensive" for police forces to commission information.

"The NFFID is owned by the Forensic Science Service. As a highly qualified specialist operation, they charge top end for information commissioned," the spokesperson said.

"The new system will be cheaper because it will be owned and operated by the police. It will also give a more complete picture."

The £4m NABID database is expected to link up with the Joint Firearms Intelligence Cell (which monitors trafficking of firearms, class A drugs and people). It will help the Association of Chief Police Officers identify emerging trends to help police target proactive initiatives and operations.

The systems will be interlinked with the long delayed National Firearm Licensing Management System (NFLMS), which is currently being rolled out to police forces across England and Wales and will be ready by the summer.

Home secretary John Reid said: "There is not a single solution to keeping guns off our streets and our children out of harms way. Contributions to this summit have made it clear that effective policing and tough penalties must go hand in hand with education, community action, and the personal responsibility of young people themselves."

This article was originally published at Kablenet.

Kablenet's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.