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Samsung showcases super speedy memory card

Data transfer speeds increased by two thirds

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Samsung has increased the data transfer speed of its fast graphics memory by two thirds. Using 80nm technology, the 4Gbps GDDR 4, which runs at 2.0GHz, is 66 per cent faster than other "commercially available memory" and Samsung's own.

The 4Gbps graphics memory, offered in a 512Mb density, has a 32-bit data bus configuration and uses JEDEC-approved standards for noise reduction.

Manufacturers of graphics processing units and video cards have apparently expressed an interest in the memory, which is ready for sampling this month. A Samsung spokesman said that the memory will add "more zip in video applications, making gaming, computer-aided design and video editing a lot faster than before."

In January, Samsung claimed it would put the first 50nm 16Gb NAND Flash chip into mass production later this quarter. The company said the chips use a "multi-level cell" design, a way of squeezing more memory capacity into a given size.

The chip doubles the memory page size to 4KB, allowing more data to be moved around the chip per second.

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